© Larry Norman Lyrics 2012
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In the early 70's, frustrated by the music industry's intention to dilute the impact  of Jesus rock through the many religious songs that mainstream artists chose  to record and the fallacious rumors that celebrities like Clapton had been  saved, Larry Norman wrote various hard hitting features that magazines and  papers wouldn't print. As a second line of attack he decamped to his home  with a pile of recording equipment and a few friends to record a series of  tongue in cheek cover version.  Randy Stonehill introduces the songs in the style of an OTT egotistical West  Coast DJ, The Surf Duke, and frankly this has some hysterically funny  moments! Their acoustic version of Norman Greenbaum's "Spirit In The Sky" is  absolutely hilarious!  Larry's imitation of Mick Jagger on the Stones' "Shine A Light" is outrageous and the segue  of "Bridge Over Troubled Water", "Let It Be" and "My Sweet Lord" is suitably respectful.  Until we get to the disco break in the latter song and Larry again adopting Mick Jagger mode  starts singing, "I'm So Bored". Call me iconoclastic but these songs deserve to be ripped  apart!  After the Clapton rumors of conversion which surface every five years or so, "Presence Of  The Lord" is given a straight rendition although it's worth bearing in mind Larry reports that  Clapton wrote it to express escaping from the police who wanted to bust him for drugs! This  CD release closes with two bonus tracks which did not appear on the original vinyl release.  This time they're introduced by Larry's Big Bomber DJ alter-ego on Radio K.R.A.P. and  include another great Mick Jagger impersonation on "I Am Waiting".  Mischievous yet making  an important contribution cataloguing counterfeit "Christian" culture.  Larry Norman: Vocals, Guitar, Percussion, and Piano  Randy Stonehill: Introduces each song as a West Coast DJ, The Surf Duke, Guitar, Backing  Vocals Charles Norman: Is the Big Bomber, Guitars 
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